Archive

Archive for May, 2012

Creativity comes from the darndest places

So we just finished our first sprint and the team is really energized.  Our velocity for this first sprint was 20 story points.  We used Fibonacci series planning poker to weigh user stories and decided to limit any user to 8 story points or less if it was to be included in the sprint. Anything greater than 8 had to go back into the backlog until it could be split up into smaller stories.  This left us with 5 stories, and a total of 20 points.  I am confident that our velocity will start to dramatically increase in a very short time.  We delivered all 5 stories, btw!

The grooming of the stories in this manner has revealed some interesting trends.  Since the user stories are fairly general, and only define “what” the software needs to do instead of “how” it does it, the development team has far fewer specifications on which to base their solutions.  At first, some team members where hesitant to move ahead without the details they were accustomed to in their past waterfall projects.  As Product Owner, I made sure the team knew that I trusted – and in fact was counting on – their creativity.  When a team member was not sure how I wanted a particular user story implemented, I would say something like “I don’t care how you do it.  Give me a couple of suggestions of how you would do it.”

It quickly became obvious that the developers were coming up with solutions that were far more clever than I or any Product Manager could have, and they were also taking into consideration far more of the long and short term ramifications of those solutions.  One of the devs said to me, “Man, the backend architecture is really going to require a lot of rework,” and then proceded to outline his solution and how he would implement it.  It was a very elagent solution.  “I hope we get this solved in time, some of the tasks in this sprint are dependent on it” he said.  To which I replied, “Even with your help, if I had gone off fully speced a backend solution myself, it would have taken me weeks.  And then I would have come back with a design for you to implement that probably wasn’t very flexible, and would have delayed the rest of the project.  By telling you what I needed instead of telling you what to do, you just solved the problem far more elegantly, and it’s only the 2nd day of the sprint!”

If  you trust the people who know the problem to solve the problem, the solutions start to flow like water.

%d bloggers like this: